Product Details

Diana Ross
Almighty Presents: We Love Diana Ross

NEW DIGITAL ALBUM FROM ALMIGHTY!

We are delighted to finally announce that, after 5 years in the making, the Diana Ross Project we have all been waiting for is now available!

This digital bundle was originally planned to be released by Universal but fortunately Universal have now granted Almighty the rights to release this from our very own Almighty website!

This bumper, digital collection is overflowing with exclusives, such as the brand new mixes of ‘Ain’t No Mountain High Enough’, 'Love Hangover' and ‘The Boss’, plus first time airings of ‘Remember Me’, ‘Reach Out And Touch’ and ‘I’m Still Waiting’, not forgetting the sensational Almighty megamix - 'In The Mix'!

Whether fronting the breakthrough act of the time 'Diana Ross and The Supremes' or as a solo artist, Diana Ross has established herself as a true legend; selling over 100 million records, charting 18 number 1's, crossing over into television and film and cementing it all with a triumphant display of distinctive and highly acclaimed awards, such as a Golden Globe, a Tony Award and no less than 12 Grammy Award nominations! This unprecedented and soul inspiring success brought us some of the most loved music in history, from 'I'm Coming Out' to 'Ain't No Mountain High Enough' and 'Upside Down' to 'Touch Me In The Morning'.

'Almighty Presents: We Love Diana Ross' is a must-have collection of Diana Ross history, presented as an uplifting dance package, a perfect contrast which compliments these timeless tracks and vocals, creating an outstanding blend of classic and 'now'.

Brian Chin on Diana follows:

Have you ever noticed that Diana Ross never tried to shorten her name to just ‘Diana’? It so happens that various of her Motown albums are called diana and Diana!; but two are called Diana Ross – and two are called Ross. You didn’t get this Beyoncé, Madonna, Reba, single-name branding kind of thing.

For Diana Ross, fame was more complex than trying to make, then claim, a name exclusively. It was even more complex than creating the classic songs here in such a timeless way, and performing them for a lifetime. To stake a place in mainstream America when Diana Ross, The Supremes, and Motown at large did, was to do so understanding that they were pioneers- African-Americans entering a level of visibility where they needed to move with all the ease of those born to privilege. No mistakes allowed.

As ego-driven as stardom is, Motown artists knew that in the early and mid-1960s, there was social strategy to getting a hit record, appearing on The Ed Sullivan Show and playing luxe nightspots like the Copacabana in New York, and London's Talk of the Town. Mrs. Maxine Powell - now Professor Powell - the finishing school coach who tutored personal carriage, imaging and professional strategy to the Motown roster in the famed Artist Development department, was a key player in the striving upwardly-mobile African-American community of post-World War II Detroit, making sure that when black people entered the echelons of power, affluence and influence, they stayed there, alongside those who were entitled by their heritage.

Keeping both names, announcing herself and her family name every time Diana Ross mounted the stage or was played on the radio, was not merely self-regard, but a tribute to the wisdom of Berry Gordy, Professor Powell and many others who dared to create and maintain the conditions for an integrated America. Diana Ross? Even Miss Ross? Yes, Ma'am, and I'd no more roll my eyes at addressing her as she wishes, than I would arrive at church in trainers and a singlet. I know she changed my world, making it more diverse, interesting and welcoming to me.

The statistics are of course, fabulous: Golden Globe winner and Oscar nominee for Lady Sings the Blues; Tony Award winner for her one-woman show An Evening With Diana Ross, and noted in the Guinness Book of World Records in 1993 for her eighteen No. 1 singles - six as a solo artist, and twelve as lead singer of The Supremes. Celebrated in the prestigious Kennedy Center Honors 2007.

But Beyoncé Knowles, Lauryn Hill and many others who've paid musical and video homage to her - all of them know this before anything else: Diana Ross set the table for those who came after her as surely as Lena Horne, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday and others set the table for her. She knows it, owns it and it’s a big reason why WE LOVE DIANA ROSS.

With gratitude,

Brian Chin
New York, October 2009


Please note: These tracks are sold as part of a bundle only and will never be available for individual download.

MP3 Bundle

1. Love Hangover (Almighty 12" Mix)
2. The Boss (Almighty 12" Essential Mix)
3. I'm Coming Out (Almighty 12" Anthem Mix)
4. Remember Me (Almighty 12" Anthem Mix)
5. No-One Gets The Prize (Almighty Anthem Radio Edit)
6. Ain't No Mountain High Enough (Almighty 12" Essential Mix)
7. I Thought It Took A Little Time (Almighty Anthem Radio Edit)
8. Lovin', Livin' And Givin' (Almighty Definitive Mix)
9. Upside Down (Almighty 12" Anthem Mix)
10. Surrender (Almighty Anthem Album Mix)
11. Touch Me In The Morning (Almighty Definitive Mix)
12. I'm Still Waiting (Almighty Breeze Mix)
13. Reach Out And Touch (Somebody's Hand) (Almighty Breeze Mix)
14. In The Mix (01:08:07)

WAV Album

1. Love Hangover (Almighty 12" Mix)
2. The Boss (Almighty 12" Essential Mix)
3. I'm Coming Out (Almighty 12" Anthem Mix)
4. Remember Me (Almighty 12" Anthem Mix)
5. No-One Gets The Prize (Almighty Anthem Radio Edit)
6. Ain't No Mountain High Enough (Almighty 12" Essential Mix)
7. I Thought It Took A Little Time (Almighty Anthem Radio Edit)
8. Lovin', Livin' And Givin' (Almighty Definitive Mix)
9. Upside Down (Almighty 12" Anthem Mix)
10. Surrender (Almighty Anthem Album Mix)
11. Touch Me In The Morning (Almighty Definitive Mix)
12. I'm Still Waiting (Almighty Breeze Mix)
13. Reach Out And Touch (Somebody's Hand) (Almighty Breeze Mix)
14. In The Mix (01:08:07)